Causes of Major Depressive Disorder

Here in this post, we are providing the “Causes of Major Depressive Disorder”. You can discuss more your concerns about mental health in our community, and we will provide you with tips and solutions in a short time. Keep visiting Mental Health.

Causes of Major Depressive Disorder

It’s not known exactly what causes depression. As with many mental disorders, a variety of factors may be involved, such as:

  • Biological differences
  • Brain chemistry
  • Hormones
  • Inherited traits
  • Abuse
  • Age
  • Certain medications
  • Conflict
  • Death or a loss
  • Gender
  • Major events
  • Other personal problems
  • Serious illnesses
Causes of Major Depressive Disorder
Causes of Major Depressive Disorder

Biological differences

People with depression appear to have physical changes in their brains. The significance of these changes is still uncertain, but may eventually help pinpoint causes.

Brain chemistry

Neurotransmitters are naturally occurring brain chemicals that likely play a role in depression. Recent research indicates that changes in the function and effect of these neurotransmitters and how they interact with neurocircuits involved in maintaining mood stability may play a significant role in depression and its treatment.

Hormones

Changes in the body’s balance of hormones may be involved in causing or triggering depression. Hormone changes can result with pregnancy and during the weeks or months after delivery (postpartum) and from thyroid problems, menopause, or a number of other conditions.

Inherited traits

Depression is more common in people whose blood relatives also have this condition. Researchers are trying to find genes that may be involved in causing depression.

Abuse

Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse can make you more vulnerable to depression later in life.

Age

People who are elderly are at higher risk of depression. That can be made worse by other factors, such as living alone and having a lack of social support.

Certain medications

Some drugs, such as isotretinoin (used to treat acne), the antiviral drug interferon-alpha, and corticosteroids, can increase your risk of depression.

Conflict

Depression in someone who has the biological vulnerability to it may result from personal conflicts or disputes with family members or friends.

Death or a loss

Sadness or grief after the death or loss of a loved one, though natural, can increase the risk of depression.

Gender

Women are about twice as likely as men to become depressed. No one’s sure why. The hormonal changes that women go through at different times of their lives may play a role.

Major events

Even good events such as starting a new job, graduating, or getting married can lead to depression. So can moving, losing a job or income, getting divorced, or retiring. However, the syndrome of clinical depression is never just a “normal” response to stressful life events.

Other personal problems

Problems such as social isolation due to other mental illnesses or being cast out of a family or social group can contribute to the risk of developing clinical depression.

Serious illnesses

Sometimes, depression happens along with a major illness or may be triggered by another medical condition.
Substance misuse.

Nearly 30% of people with substance misuse problems also have major or clinical depression. Even if drugs or alcohol temporarily make you feel better, they ultimately will aggravate depression.

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